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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
for talking with us this morning, dr. torrey. he's the founder of the treatment advocacy center. we now go to a live hearing of the senate judiciary committee. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> i want to thank the senator pat leahy for giving us the opportunity to have this hearing today. we are pleased to have such a large audience for the hearing. it demonstrates the importance of this issue. at the outset, i want to note that the rules of the senate prevent outbursts or clapping or demonstrations of any kind during these hearings. there was so much interest in today's hearings that we had to expand opportunity for the audience in an adjoining room. the overflow room is 226 of the dirksen building. i will make opening remarks and give ranking member cruz the same opportunity and then welcome our first witness. we are here to discuss a critically important issue, maybe a very basic question. we venerate in this country are committed to the life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness of those who live in amer
of us will get 100% of what we want. democrats, they've got to, you know, make some tough choices too. democrats like me, we've said we're prepared to make some tough cuts and reforms, including the programs like medicare. but if we're willing to compromise, then republicans in the house have to compromise as well. that's what democracy's about. that's what this country needs right now. so -- [applause] let me just make one last point, by the way, for those who are following this. lately some people have been saying, well, maybe we'll just give the president some flexibility. he can make the cuts the way he wants them, and that way it won't be as damaging. you know, the problem is when you're cutting $85 billion in seven months, which represents over a 10% cut in the defense budget in seven months, there's no smart way to do that. there's no smart way to do that. you don't want to have to choose between -- let's see, do i close funding for the disabled kid or the poor kid? do i close this navy ship yard or some other one? when you're doing things in a way that's not smart, you can't g
of the subcommittee. i am looking forward to working with the ranking members as we both share a commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our board agents -- ensuring our border agents receive the support they need to protect homeland. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of home as security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshmen majority members. we have mr. richard hudson of north carolina. later joining us will be stephen from montana. they bring a welcome experience to their new roles in congress and the subcommittee. i look for to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of hds. -- of dhs. i think the subcommittee staffer diligently working together to put this hearing together. thank you for that. i now recognize myself for an opening statement. next month marks 10 years since the creation of the dhs with the homeless security act of 2001. the attacks on september 11 forced to rethink our approach to defining the homeland. as the commission report document
to destroy. >> today the u.s. government filed charges against the agencies of standard & poor's for its role in the 2008 economic cries. s & p rates investments. when they give an investment a high rating it's considered a low risk. even the most conservative investors like pension funds feel confident buying that product. well the justice department allegeses that s & p knowingly gave high rates to toxic bad mortgages that s & p knew were risky because s & p wanted more business from the banks that createed those purposefully risky bad bundles. that's right. they said the agency, they're getting paid by the very banks they're evaluating. a little conflict of credit? >> s & p misled investors including federally insureed financial institutions causing them to lose billions of dollars. >> going after the credit rating agencies have been a long time in coming. they've called it code made alchemy. they've been doing it for three years and during that time s & p turned over 100 million pages of documents including e-mails between employees and some damaging information has come from those e-mail
with us any more because it can kill ya in a snap. sam andrew: it was inevitable and really surprising both at the same time. michael joplin: when she died of a heroin overdose it was really hard cause i didn't have a role model anymore. jim langdon: nobody was surprised, i wasn't surprised at her death but one of the most truly surprising surprising things about janis is life and death is that she's still with us. thirty seven years later no mater where you are in america you can flip on your car radio and at some point or another you're going to hear janis joplin singing. powell st. john janis was like a racecar driver. you win races and you get great adulation from the fans. but there's always the chance that they'll wipe out. john cooke: i had a dream where janis was on stage. and it was the end of the set, the end of the encore. and, that was maybe a month or so after she died, and i felt like it was janis coming to say goodbye. janis came down the ramp, and there was this little girl needing approval and comfort and she said, "was it okay, was i okay?" and i said, "yo
call or e-mail us. we also want to hear from you on twitter. in january, a northwestern university professor david figlio talked about school choice at the university of florida law school. this is an hourlong event. >> thank you. the bob graham's center for public service is very pleased to co-sponsor this. this is a great policy for us to look at. david figlio is the professor of education, social policy and economics at northwestern university. he is also a research associate at the national bureau of economic research and a founding member of the research program on the economics of education. his research on education and social policy has been funded by the u.s. department of education, the nih and the gates foundation among many others. his current research involves evaluating the tax credit scholarship program, the largest school voucher program in the united states. conducting a large-scale study of school accountability in florida and following children from birth through school career to study keep questions regarding early childhood poverty analysts inequality. prior to
here with us. >> reporter: showers falling, once again, into the north bay. what your morning commute might look like coming up. >>> more drama as the olympic star track returns to court. why his tearful testimony may result in a delay. >>> and a huge tree comes crashing down on a multi- million dollar house. >> reporter: we're live in palo alto where everyone who follows them online will be taken on a virtual ride along. we'll tell you why it is so important to them. >>> good morning. i'm dave clark. >> i'm tori campbell. it's tuesday, february 19th. >>> we're on stormwatch as rain returns to the bay area for the first time in two weeks. we've been covering this live for you since 4:30. we have team coverage. steve paulson is tracking the temperatures and even snow. sal castanedo is looking out for the traffic. but alex savidge shows us the conditions in petaluma. >> reporter: good morning, tori. we're seeing a brief band of showers kind of blowing through this area in petaluma, where we've been all morning long. this is highway 101. this is southbound traffic coming toward the camer
us to talk about this project. and saru jayaraman is exposing secrets of restaurants around the country. plus richard simmons joins us to talk about his new project too. it's thursday, february 7th. "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. our starting point this morning is bracing for the big one. right now there's a blizzard watch in effect for parts of new england. there's a winter storm heading to the northeast. it could be historic because it is expected to leave behind more than two feet of snow in some places with the first flakes falling tomorrow. we want to get right to indra petersons, she's tracking the weather for us out of atlanta. good morning. >> back on february 17th and 18th of 2003, boston got 27 1/2 inches of snow. we're looking to see whether or not we break that record with this nor'easter. let's talk about how it's expected to form. we're currently watching some severe weather potentially pushing through. we even had a tornado warning in southeast louisiana this morning. this now is forming into a low. it's pathology up towards the car
's approaching. >>> new this morning, u.s. secrets possibly exposed. iran releasing data that it claims it hacked from a drone. we'll have a live report ahead. >>> governor chris christie has some harsh words for a doctor who said she was afraid he would die in office. he says come see him or zip it. >> until that time, she should shut up. >> new details about lance armstrong's efforts to get back into the game. >>> and it's confirmed, the federal reserve was hacked. is our banking system secure enough? >>> among our guests this morning, janet robinson, a superintendent of the newtown public schools. anna deveer smith from the actress from nurse jackie is working with mayors against illegal guns. she'll join us to talk about this project. and saru jayaraman is exposing secrets of restaurants around the country. plus richard simmons joins us to talk about his new project too. it's thursday, february 7th. "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. our starting point this morning is bracing for the big one. right now there's a blizzard watch in effect for parts of new england. there'
," and last week's "time" magazine cover carried the same title, and, of course, the administration's use of drones for targeting terrorists to con cronet our war on terrorism has come to be a central issue in the confirmation hearing of the proposed cia directer, the nominee, john brennan. however, privacy issues and military applications of uas beyond the scope of this hearing. i use the term "unmanned aircraft systems" or usa instead of uas or drones because it is a more complete term. uas are complex systems made up of not just aircraft, but as well as supporting ground, air, and communications infrastructure. uas comes in a variety of shapes and sizes and carries out a wide range of missions. aviation has come a long way in a relatively short period of time thanks to american innovation and i think newty. the list of pioneers in aviation and aerospace is very long. you may not know the details of the achievement, but i'm shore you know names like cesna, james mcdonald and donald douglas, howard hughes, william boeing, charles limbburg, kelly johnson just to name a few. the next steps
their for twitter @cspanwj, then facebook.com/span, or email us a c-span.org. more off the lead in washington post -- on the line to tell us more about the story is sarah cliff. welcome to the program. guest: thank you for having me. host: why this opt-out? guest: the opt-out has been an area that has challenged the ministration for all but a week -- for over a year, trying to find a balance between reproductive health and also guaranteeing religious liberty. as to the wine now part -- they have promised since about a year ago, last february, they promised religious organizations and would come up with regulations that would find a middle ground. reason we're seeing it now is because i wanted to give companies a heads up about what the compromise would look like. host: what has been the response from supporters of the president? guest: supporters of the president are happy with it. it seems to guarantee widespread access to birth control, regardless of who your employer is. host: opponents of the president's plan and say what? guest: say it does not answer their problems, for two reasons. first, t
to give us a call, the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. if you want to reach out to us on social media, you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/c-spanwj. around 40 people so far responding on facebook. and you can send us an e-mail to journal@c-span.org. the survey that was mentioned talks a little bit about respondents' and what they were asked about as far as their retirement plans and if the financial crisis be laid all of that. it says that respondents delaying retirement, nearly half of them planned to do so. this was done in 2010, but predicting the number retiring, it was important to consider three developments -- host: when they were asked as a result of the financial crisis if you are a household member planning to postpone retirement. in the first 45 minutes this morning from you, we want to hear about your retirement plans and of the financial crisis delayed that. tell us yes, no, and if you could, how those plans changed. the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. fo
'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian terry who was killed in december 2010 in the line of duty in arizona. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshman majority members. today we have mr. kief rothfuss from pennsylvania and mr. richard hudson of north carolina, and later joining us will be mr. steven gaines of montana. they bring a wealth of experience to their new roles in the congress and on the subcommittee at a look forward to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of dhs. let me pause for just a minute and think the subcommittee staff who have worked diligently to put this first hearing
water. >> cities can ban recreational use of pot, but they have to do fracking? >> i want state governors to get out there and allow them to get what is ours? liz, i got to ask you a question. you seemed negative there on allowing america to go get what we own. >> no, i'm -- listen, i don't like big government stomping on little cities threatening them with lawsuits. that's what i didn't like. i'm a small government person, i am. >> what? big state government -- >> he's threatening -- the governor is threatening to sue his city. that's what is at issue. >> all right, liz. are you back tomorrow? >> i don't know. probably not. [laughter] >> do you or do you not favor fracking? >> i support -- yes, i support it in a safe way. >> you live in new york? >> yes, i do. >> urban new york? >> yes. what's the point? >> governor cuomo is delaying the rules on fracking. >> unfortunate. >> we're out of time. thank you, charles, great having you. dagen, connell, to you. connell: what a point to end on. have a great day. dagen: i'm dagen. connell: stock market is toying with a new all-time high
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
johnson signed the law in 1965, americans of color get that right and states, like yours, could not use tactics to undermine it. he explained the importance of section five best on in the speech saying the heart of the act is plain. wherever by clear and objective standards, states and counties are using regulations or laws or tests to deny the right to vote, then they will be struck down. it is clear state officials intend to discriminate. the federal examiners will be sent in to register all voters. when the process of elimination is gone, the examiners will be withdrawn. for the first time millions of african-americans could vote without undue influence or violence. let's be honest about a few things. first, 1965 was not that long ago. even if the images are in black and white, it's around the corner historically. and the redistricting plan was as recent as 2006. the process that will unravel or sustain a key act begins. the way the supreme court decides is vitally important and could leave many americans, particularly americans of color with less right to vote. there's a lot to unpa
of lives. u.s. military troops, luca, a german shepherd lost her left leg in afghanistan. now she travels the country promoting a working dog memorial. next the bad. this grocery worker tried to jump the chain but doesn't quite get the height needed. takes down the shelves, spilling food over the aisles. he wasn't hurt. the ugly. a 49ers fan forget it is only a game. she is hysterical after ravens beat san francisco in the super bowl. the fan can't hold back those tears. she says she is a life long fan of the 49ers. maybe not his hysterical but she was crying. >> it is time for your brew on this question of the day responses. we've been talking about the super bowl all morning. earlier we asked you what your favorite moment of that game was and here are your responses. >> thanks to everyone who responded. what a fun party you went to? >> it was great. we had a blast. left a little too late. >> like a lot of people. everybody have a great day. "fox & friends" starts now. >>gretchen: up too late? never. good morning, everybody. today is monday, february 4. i'm gretchen carlson. i hope you'r
the numbers on the screen if you would like to participate in the conversation. you can contact us via social media as well on twitter or facebook. and e-mail. front page of the washington times this morning -- backs the "washington times small lead story this morning. should sequestration be allowed hrough?roopt that's our question. we begin with a democrat in georgia. caller: the democrats need to stay away from this. these people's ratings are so low. they should allow the sequester. this is the only way. obama and the democrats need to do everything they can to protect the social programs, medicare, social security. if they cut these programs, they are going to lose. let the republicans put these cuts on the table. on immigration, as far as the sequester, it will help. the democrats must no allow these people amnesty without giving african-americans amnesty who have misdemeanors who served their time. host: we are talking about sequestration during this first segment. thomas in texas on the republican line. should sequestration be allowed? caller: i don't feel that it is our best option,
. >>steve: it was crazy. did you prepare a report for us this morning? >>brian: no. oh yeah, i did. in fact, i did. here's a look back at one of the most bizarre and, dare i say, electrifying super bowls of all time. >> when the cannons went off both teams were ready to play, but in reality it was the ravens, not the 49ers, going for the gold. joe flacco on fire. when jacoby jones cut the touchdown pass, the game looked almost over. for us, it was beyonce time. for san francisco, time to regroup. >> in the locker room, guys were saying come on, let's go. we have to believe. we have to keep our spirits high. >> third-quarter kickoff. more baltimore. jones again. 28-6. then the unprecedented, the unexpected. a 35-minute power outage. >> service will be restored momentarily. >> the setting surreal. but when the power returned, so did the 9er passion. colin kaepernick with his arm, with his feet. finally, we had a game. >> we made them throw the ball. he had a hard time beating us, but he got going. the kid can play. >> down by 5, essentially would come down to one last play. >> the baltimore r
: and i know you can use the money. it's been flooding in your apartment recently, so... >> yes. we had 4 feet of water in my apartment yesterday. meredith: oh, my god. >> so i had no hot water this morning. so i'm here. it's a nice day to be on tv when you can't take a shower. meredith: oh! >> ha ha! meredith: that explains it. no, no. i'm only kidding. i'm teasing. >> i apologize right now. meredith: you smell wonderful. and you look great. you look like a million bucks, and you're on your way. still taking on round 1. banked $56,000 so far. 8 away from the million, and you have 2 lifelines remaining. great position to be in. are you ready? >> i'm ready. meredith: audience, are you ready? audience: yeah! meredith: then let's play "millionaire." all right, tammy, first question. what was the name of the group formed to protest the salvation army's war against alcohol in the 1800s? demon army, dark army, satan's army, skeleton army? >> oh. ok. the group formed to protest against alcohol. i think i'm gonna jump this question. i have a vague inkling, but i'm not-- meredith: ok. >> let's jum
. thank you for being with us on the "washington journal." the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., february 14, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable chris collins to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 3, 2013, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. mullen, for five minutes. -- mr. mullin, for five minutes. mr. mullin: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house and to revise and extend. the speaker pro te
with a ferry on the san francisco bay. >> new information in the oscar pistorius case. how the weapon was used. >>> the city is preparing for a big five k walk. we will tell you who it benefits and some road closures you will want to know about. >>> good morning, everybody. welcome to "mornings on 2". it is sunday, february 17th. i am mike mibach. >> i am claudine wong. >> good morning, rosemary. >> we have a good looking day and the cooling trends continues for the sunday. waking up with patchy fog and clouds. cool start once again. 30s and 40s into the bay area. temperatures will take a dip. i will tell you by how much. we will be tracking cold weather in the next week ahead. that is coming up. >>> runners are limbering up for what is a san francisco tradition. lorraine blanco is live in china town where they are celebrating the lunar new year. >> they are celebrating the year of the snake. >> people are setting up for the big five k walk. this is at the intersection of sacramento and grant street in san francisco's chinatown. it is the oldest and largest in the nation. the celebration is th
, and as history has shown us, i know there are conspiracies and all. what do you think is the reason he is leaving now? >> i wouldn't want to speculate. we'll hear a lot more in the weeks to come. i would advice everyone to google the story about the vatican's butler who lived with his wife inside the walls. he went to jail for leaking the pope's emails last year. many tell the he was a fall guy the pontiff visited him in prison. he's been invited to come back and live in the vatican once his term has ended raising eyebrows as to what that is about. i do want toage the good positive progressive things this pope oh has done. we're going to be talking about his deplorable record on women gay folks, this pope is the most famous live to have been against the iraq war from the beginning a leading voice to embrace climate change science. there is not a more famous death penalty advocate in the world. he says every nation on earth has an obligation to provide health care to its poorest residents. he's been left of our left and right of our right making him a confounding figure. >> that's not breaking wit
solutions that will allow us to use power in a smarter manner, produce clean and abundant renewable energy and reduce emissions through energy efficiency. these are things we should be able to agree on and work together on in a bipartisan manner. it is critical that we move forward with a sense of urgency and take meaningful action that addresses the very real threats of climate change that are already impacting our country. sequestration is devastating america today. madam speaker, we just heard from one of my colleagues. this week we're scheduled to go on recess on friday. i hope that my colleague that spoke today, mr. speaker, reaches out to speaker boehner and eric cantor to say, let's stop the sequestration from happening. it's quite simple. the fix to this legislation could be put together in one sentence. stop it. i guess even better in two words. madam speaker, we have a sense of urgency across the country when it comes to working on climate change legislation, but as we talk about the impact to each and every one of our districts with what sequestration will bring with job losses,
aware of its widespread use. as a freshman legislator in oregon 40 years ago, my opinion was set by a hog farmer from eastern oregon who was a state representative named stafford. stafford held the oregon house and the people crowded in the galleries spellbound with his tutorial on marijuana and its comparison to other addictive substances, both legal and illegal. this older gentlemen who didn't smoke, didn't drink alcohol, let alone use marijuana, made his case. he pointed out how tobacco was highly addictive and killed hundreds of thousands of americans per year. he discussed alcohol whose damaging properties had once led the country into a foolish, costly and ultimately self-defeated experiment with prohibition. alcohol use was damaging for some, led to dependency for many while contributing to tens of thousands of highway deaths every year. by the time the representative got to marijuana, he convinced the bill he was advocating to have legalization, something i should advocate, something oregonians should be allowed this choice, less addicting than tobacco. we didn't legalize
would use d.c. area airports and fewer people will take vacations this summer. >> today's the day you can start entering the lottery to get tickets for one of the most popular events in d.c. >> the annual white house easter egg roll, the ticket lottery started to cry a.m. this morning and will end on 10:00 february 25. >> in business news, is american or british dates for boeing. >> few americans are spending money now that paychecks are getting smaller. linda bell joins us with those stories and more. >> w know anyone spending less now that our paychecks are a little lighter? the payroll tax cut is leaving 70% of americans to cut back on spending. the national retail federation says many are delaying major purchases on items such as tv sets furniture, and cars. wal-mart is blaming this for dismal. february dismal we will pay close attention to what walmart says later today when they report their quarterly results later this morning. you mentioned going. -- boeing. they will present regulators with a redesign of the 787 dreamliner's battery in order to get the jets back in the air. i
to "morning joe." everyone's a little tired here for some reason. with us on set, we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. wake up, mike. and the president of the council on foreign relations -- you were not up. richard was. it was so good. >> how many times have you been now? >> you haven't been. >> 13th time. >> willie, have you been? >> i have not been to the opera. >> it's really good. lincoln center. >> i walked past the fountain at the lincoln center. >> you have to go. i'm going to force you. >> on the way to p.j. clark's. >> right across. obviously, we have a lot to talk about. coming up, the sequester, of course, is going down to the wire. robert gibbs had some interesting comments on drones which we'll talk about. but, of course, it was the big night at the oscars that everyone is probably still talking about this morning. complete with some redemption for ben affleck. affleck and the crew of "argo" beat out films like "lincoln" and "silver linings playbook" to win best picture. but "lincoln" had its day in the sun as daniel day-lewis earned his third academy award for best actor.
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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